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   Investment Thoughts - Markets in History

 

 

Markets in History

Historical Perspectives on Markets and the Economy

 

 

 articles 1-10 / 94   page 1 of 10 »  
 
The Count of Monte Cristo
The Count of Monte Cristo has numerous financial data and speculations in it that shows that during the Napoleonic years there was active speculations.
Daily Speculations, September 16, 2018 , Victor Niederhoffer

General Electric: The Fallen Giant
"General Electric’s decline has been steady during the 21st century. In 2000, GE’s market cap was over $500 billion and as recently as 2005, General Electric was the largest company in the world. Since then, GE has lost over $400 billion in market cap, and today, GE doesn’t even make the top 50 in the world."
Global Financial Data, 22 June 2018 , Dr. Brian Taylor

The Russian Stock Market Before the Revolution
"Russian stocks advanced more in price than American stocks between 1864 and 1914, but American companies paid larger dividends. Price and dividends offset each other and during that 45-year period, the two stock markets provided approximately equal returns."
Global Financial Data, 21 March 2018 , Dr. Brian Taylor

Market Capitalization Amazon vs. Sears
1999 vs. 2017
L2 Inc. December 2017 , Scott Galloway

Retail's Anti-Christ
Market Value Today vs. 2006
NYU, December 2017 , Scott Galloway

The First Billion-Dollar Company
It was only back in 1970 that the capitalization of the entire United States stock market hit $1 trillion and soon a single company may be worth that much. This raises the question, what was the first company to be worth $1 billion?
Global Financial Data, 15 November 2017 , Dr. Brian Taylor

Volatility (or Lack Thereof) Isn’t Predictive
"While it’s tempting to think danger lurks under still waters—and financial media provide prompts aplenty—calm periods don’t portend big price movements ahead. Nor do they herald further tranquility. Volatility—low or high; up or down—is incapable of foretelling the future."
Fisher Investments MarketMinder, November 16, 2017 , Editorial Staff

The Bank Bubble of 1929
"In reality, the bull market of the 1920s had more of an impact upon utility stocks and bank stocks than it did on industrial and railroad stocks."
Global Financial Data, June 3, 2017 , Dr. Brian Taylor

Benjamin Harrison and the Terrible Tariff
"The Smoot-Hawley Act of 1930 is blamed for intensifying the Great Depression, and the lesser-known McKinley Tariff of 1890 provides an instructive lesson on how protectionist policies can impact the stock market and politics."
Global Financial Data, January 25th 2017 , Dr. Brian Taylor

The Future of Energy Prices: Lessons from 750 Years of History
"... for most of history, commodity prices stayed the same for periods of several centuries. It was mainly in the 1500s and the 1900s that the world experienced irreversible increases in commodity prices."
Global Financial Data, January 5th 2017 , Dr. Brian Taylor


 

Themes

 

Asia

Bonds

Bubbles and Crashes

Business Cycles
Central Banks

China

Commodities
Contrarian

Corporates

Creative Destruction
Credit Crunch

Currencies

Current Account

Deflation
Depression 

Equity
Europe
Financial Crisis
Fiscal Policy

Germany

Gloom and Doom
Gold

Government Debt

Historical Patterns

Household Debt
Inflation

Interest Rates

Japan

Market Timing

Misperceptions

Monetary Policy
Oil
Panics
Permabears
PIIGS
Predictions

Productivity
Real Estate

Seasonality

Sovereign Bonds
Systemic Risk

Switzerland

Tail Risk

Technology

Tipping Point
Trade Balance

U.S.A.
Uncertainty

Valuations

Yield